See the moment crane lifting demonstration goes from impressive to unreal

Watch this amazing feat of German engineering as a giant Liebherr LR13000 mobile tower crane with a 3,000-ton capacity lifts a Liebherr LR11350 with a 1,350-ton capacity.
Incredibly, the LR11350 is lifting a LR1350/I with a 350-ton capacity at the same time, and the LR1350 is lifting a TR1100 with a 100-ton capacity! More amazing yet – all three cranes being lifted by the LR13000 are loaded to capacity. A crowd of enthusiastic Liebherr fans can hardly believe what they're seeing as they watch this incredible demonstration.
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According to Liebherr, Hans Liebherr saw a need in 1949 Germany – a need for a country devastated by war to rebuild. He worked with engineers and tradesman to create the first mobile tower crane in 1949, a crane that could easily be transported and set up at work sites.
Today's modern offerings, including the LR13000 and other mobile tower cranes featured in the video, are fast-erecting and top slewing cranes with crawler track travel gear that ensures solid traction in even the roughest terrain. This type of crane with a crawler undercarriage is highly mobile, making it a practical and cost effective option for nearly any type of work site.
The Liebherr LR13000 has the distinction of being the most powerful conventional crawler crane in the world, and is often used in power plant construction, due to its ability to hoist extreme component weights. It's also a top choice in refineries, due to a need to hoist industrial columns weighing 1,500 tons and over 100 yards in length.
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